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KeyArena was last renovated in 1995 at a cost of approximately $75 million. Now, several groups are vying for the chance to redevelop the building to attract an NBA and/or NHL team. Photo by Joe Veyera
KeyArena was last renovated in 1995 at a cost of approximately $75 million. Now, several groups are vying for the chance to redevelop the building to attract an NBA and/or NHL team. Photo by Joe Veyera
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Monday, January 16, 2017 3:39 PM

More than a decade after then-Sonics owner Howard Schultz initially floated a taxpayer-funded $200-plus million renovation plan for KeyArena — the first attempt at rehabbing the facility after its 1995 rebuild — the building is once again at the forefront of the city’s professional basketball hopes.

 
  • A future for the Key?

    More than a decade after then-Sonics owner Howard Schultz initially floated a taxpayer-funded $200-plus million renovation plan for KeyArena — the first attempt at rehabbing the facility after its 1995 rebuild — the building is once again at the forefront of the city’s professional basketball hopes.

     
  • Roy Street Shelter gets storage help for clients
    It’s been a little more than a year since a former Seattle City Light power control center at 157 Roy St. opened as a shelter operated by the Downtown Emergency Services Center, with the capacity for 100 men.
  • Selected reports from the Seattle Police Department’s West Precinct. They represent the officers’ accounts of the events described.


  • Let the session begin
    Sen. Reuven Carlyle, and Reps. Gael Tarleton and Noel Frame all ran unopposed, and will now be faced with crafting solutions to some of the state’s largest looming questions, starting with school funding. 
  • Ex-Kingdome rental car taxes head to youth, amateur sports
    It’s been more than 15 years since Seattle said goodbye to the Kingdome. It’s been more than 20 since King County had to commit more than $50 million to repairing the domed stadium’s failing roof. 
  • Selected reports from the Seattle Police Department’s West Precinct. They represent the officers’ accounts of the events described.


  • City issues decision on Children and Family Justice Center
    Voters approved a nine-year property tax lid lift to replace the aging Youth Services Center in Seattle's Central District in 2012. The estimated cost at the time was $210 million.
  • Work continues to fix Magnolia sewer pipe
    King County contractors are continuing work to fix a break in a sewer pipe that carries wastewater and stormwater to the Magnolia Wet Weather Storage Facility at Smith Cove. 
  • A proposal for a 7-story building in Uptown with 56 residential units and three live-work units will again go before the West Design Review Board later this month. 
  • Interbay Whole Foods hosts Jan. 5 blood drive
    On Jan. 5, the Whole Foods in Interbay (2001 15th Ave. W.) will host one of the 18 drives taking place in Western Washington and Oregon, with slots available from noon to 5:30 p.m. 
  • Human Services director says finding site taking longer that expected encampments to open
  • Hearing Examiner sides with Queen Anne Community Council on backyard cottage appeal
    It was Marty Kaplan and the Community Council that won a key battle last month, when the city’s hearing examiner ruled in their favor on an appeal regarding the determination of non-significance in relation to the State Environmental Policy Act. 
  • The logistics of 'letting it snow'
    Snow is a rarity in Seattle. When it hits, many people would rather cancel their plans than deal with the roads, uncertain transit schedules, uninitiated motorists and general mess that comes from the cold white stuff.
  • The Seattle City Council last week unanimously passed an ordinance restricting move-in fees for renters and establishing privileges for renters to pay those fees over time.
  • How many is too many?

    If there’s one seemingly universal truth about children, it’s their inquisitive nature. 

    Kathryn Dennis remembers being that kind of kid. 

  • According to the SFD, just after 6 a.m. on Saturday morning crews were called to a home in the 1900 block of 6th Avenue West.
  • Selected reports from the Seattle Police Department’s West Precinct. They represent the officers’ accounts of the events described.
  • The Branson, Missouri, company behind Seattle’s “duck boat” tours is being fined $500,000 by the federal government for unwitting legal violations uncovered following investigation into the 2015 Aurora Bridge accident that killed five people, according to an announcement made Tuesday by the U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

     
  • Grant plans on public financing for city council campaign
    “We know that when people heard our message, they agreed with it," the ex-Tenants Union Executive Director says of his 2015 campaign
  • After being bumped back to committee last month, Seattle City Councilmember Kshama Sawant’s renter legislation capping move-in fees will go back before the full council for possible approval on Monday, Dec. 12.
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