Like last year's Magnolia Auto Show, featured above, this year's event promises to offer cars that will grab anyone's interest. These offerings include old classics, such as the Auburn, to new classics, like the Mustang. The event will run from 9 a.m to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 20 along Magnolia's West McGraw Street.

Like last year's Magnolia Auto Show, featured above, this year's event promises to offer cars that will grab anyone's interest. These offerings include old classics, such as the Auburn, to new classics, like the Mustang. The event will run from 9 a.m to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 20 along Magnolia's West McGraw Street.

The annual Magnolia Auto Show is revving up for another big event on Aug. 20.

Like in years past, collectors of classic automobiles from Queen Anne, Magnolia, and even a few people from out of Washington state are bringing an estimated 80 prized cars. The classic rides  will be shown off at the event, which will be held on West McGraw Street, between 32nd and 34th Avenues West. Visitors can expect to see a wide variety of very special cars among this year’s lineup.

Magnolia’s Eric Berge, the owner of Werner’s Crash Shop, an auto repair business on Lower Queen Anne, is organizing the event. This is the fourth year in a row that the shop owner has taken it upon himself to organize the event.

“Growing up I had always been involved in cars,” Berge said. “I know a lot of guys that are still around who own cool cars. People would come into my shop and ask me if the show was happening or not, so I decided to keep it going.”

Berge contacted the Magnolia Chamber of Commerce (the sponsor of the show) to get the ball rolling. Then he put together a mailing list of past participants and it was spread around the neighborhood by word of mouth. “The show itself is non-profit,” he said. “ All the [registration] money goes to Northwest Harvest,” Berge said. “We cover the cost of the permits, T-shirts and posters.”

As Berge explains, the Magnolia Auto show is purely about showing off cars, no awards are given and no one is singled out. 

“It’s a celebration of the automobile,” Berge said.  “Everyone gets together. You see people who you haven’t seen in a while.” 

Berge also explains that you don’t get one style of car or just a bunch of muscle cars. Instead, all kinds of four-wheeled vehicles will on display, including classic beauties, such as Auburns, Corvettes, Mustangs, Dodge power wagons, four-by-fours and many more.

Most, if not all, of the cars are hobby projects by car enthusiasts. These aren’t professionals showing off their product line.

“The Magnolia Auto Show is about getting these cars out of their tombs and letting them breathe,” Berge said of the refurbished mobiles. “I know this dentist that lives on the hill who fixed up a mid-1930s Ford and I’ve never seen it. There are a lot of cars that we don’t get to see.”

Berge is hoping to coax some of those rarely seen beauties out of their garages and into the Magnolia Village.

One of the main reasons why Berge became involved in the show is because he feels it’s important that people not only see the cars themselves, but to see the culture and history of the automobile. 

“Cars look the same these days,” he said.  “In the 60s, 70s and 80s, each car’s style was unique and you don’t see that nowadays.”

Magnolia resident and car enthusiast Aaron Bergstrom is a prime example of the type of person who will be showing his or her car on Saturday. Bergstrom has lived in Magnolia all his life and got the car bug from his dad, Paul Bergstrom. 

“When I was growing up my dad was always working on something cool,” Aaron Bergstrom said. “My brother and I would give him a hand.”

One of Bergstrom’s cars is a 1986 Camaro, which he’s had since he was 17. 

“My dad found it in a field in Snohomish,” Bergstrom said. “We got it running progressively, everything’s been changed.”

Bergstrom has participated in the car show every year. “[Eric] Berge and I go back,” he said. “My dad would always talk about him. [Berge] would even babysit me when I was young and I worked at Werner’s Crash Shop from when I was 18 to 25.”

The auto show will start at 9 a.m., (with participants moving their cars in at 8 a.m.) and end at 3 p.m. If you want to enter your car, contact Eric Berge at 206-285-0780 or eric@wernerscrashshop.com. The entrance fee for participants is $20.