<p class="p1"><strong>Maria Torre (from left), Claudia Starnes, Kate Oest-Larsen and Carly Cohen deliver their snack and bus-pass kits to the Queen Anne Helpine. (Not pictured: Grace Kennedy and Isabelle Ayres). All are attend either John Hay Elementary School or St. Anne School. Photo courtesy of Diane Torre</strong></p>

Maria Torre (from left), Claudia Starnes, Kate Oest-Larsen and Carly Cohen deliver their snack and bus-pass kits to the Queen Anne Helpine. (Not pictured: Grace Kennedy and Isabelle Ayres). All are attend either John Hay Elementary School or St. Anne School. Photo courtesy of Diane Torre

Camp Fire girls from Queen Anne delivered snack and bus-pass kits to the Queen Anne Helpline on Nov. 12. The girls assembled the kits during one of their regularly scheduled meetings. Then they decorated the kits with pictures of rainbows, campfires and kids having fun. 

“All these snacks are making me feel hungry,” said Carly Cohen, a member of the group, but she knew they had to keep filling the bags so that the less-fortunate people in the neighborhood would benefit from them.

The girls made their way upstairs to the Queen Anne Helpline (311 W. McGraw St.), where they delivered the kits to executive director Lisa Moore, who gladly accepted them and proceeded to give the girls a tour of the food bank. 

“The bus passes really help,” Moore said. “The families will really appreciate the snacks, and the kids will love how beautifully decorated the bags are.” 

Moore also explained to the girls that people who are poor or needy don’t always walk around in beat-up, dirty clothes: “The poor can look like anybody. You never know what a person’s situation is. We treat everyone that comes in here the same.”

The girls embroidered dogs on dish towels, made puppy-printed paw towels and baked homemade dog treats shaped like dog bones. They wrapped the dog treats up in fancy bags decorated with dogs and sold at them at the Bigelow yard sale in June.

“We wanted a dog-themed sale because people around here really love their pets, including me!” said Camp Fire girl Maria Torre. 

The towels and treats sold out in 55 minutes, and the Camp Fire girls made $75. They used the money they made from the sale to buy the items in the kits. 

They have $20 left over and will give that to a charity that is helping the victims of the typhoon in the Philippines. One member of the Camp Fire group has relatives over in the Philippines so helping the people over there is close to their hearts.

The service project allowed the girls to earn a few beads to sew on their blue Camp Fire USA vests, but mostly, they learned how good it feels to help others and to have fun in the process. 

“It felt good to me that I was helping people. I really want to do this again next year,” said Camp Fire girl Claudia Starnes.

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